McDonalds (Canada, any way) gets transparency right

You may remember back in June there was a bit of hubbub over Mcdonald’s Canada answering very transparently a question from someone about how and why they doctor the advertising images they use to sell hamburgers. They did a great job on video of walking through the photo shoot process–and dispelled a lot of myths and cynicism along the way.

They are continuing in this vein with this new video about french fries. A McDonald’s supply manager (clearly Canadian with his pronunciation of words like pro-cess) answers questions about whether McDonald’s fries are really potatoes, whether or not they are formed or cut, and why there is so much salt on them. The video walks us through the whole french fry process from farm to customer. In the pro-cess, answers from customers are provided, offering reassurance.

Certainly there are those out there who don’t think anyone should eat fried foods. And so they will say, look at all that horrible frying. Well, if you don’t like fried foods or french fries this video isn’t going to convince you otherwise.

The point is that here is a lesson for the entire food production industry. Be transparent. If there is any part of the way you do things that will not stand up to this kind of video presentation, you had better start changing it now. Because while McDonald’s is featuring a pleasant looking supply manager (who maybe has eaten a fry or two too many, just like me), a video about your process may wind up on YouTube without you doing it or knowing about it. So much better for McDonald’s to be telling their own story, even if some won’t like it.

Great job McDonald’s Canada.

 

2 thoughts on “McDonalds (Canada, any way) gets transparency right”

  1. Hello Gerald … as I watched the video about the story of the McDonald’s french fries … i’m reminded how often companies put in place sound crisis communications and business continuity programs for their own operations … but disregard to look at their whole supply chain … that omission could prove to be disastrous when something happens to put into question the integrity of your product … a lesson, know your business but you’d better also know the business of your partners and suppliers too and full confidence of their own practices.

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