What are you doing to train staff and employees of your crisis plan?

A client asked for help in training their construction company employees of their crisis management plan. There were several reasons:
1. To let them know and assure them that the leadership of the company was preparing for all eventualities
2. To help them understand what is needed to protect the company’s future in a crisis so they can understand and support the effort if they are not actively involved.
3. To serve as introductory training for those who may be asked to be trained for specific roles such as in operations, planning, information gathering, distribution, etc.

To assist them with this I created a ten minute video which details the crisis management organization structure, the kind of training key managers were getting to fill their roles, and the priorities of the company in responding: taking the right actions and communicating them well.  At the end of the video the employees are asked to take an online test which will verify that they have indeed watched it and understood the content. Taking this test will be required.

Going through this process got me thinking about the ways companies and organizations are going about training both those who will participate and the employees in general.  I know that training is a big issue for a lot of companies, and I am deep into a video training series for a global oil company that provides details on every role in the crisis communication structure. It is designed for a global audience and should help reduce significantly the costs associated with regular training involving travel, classroom time. I’ve come to be strong believer in the future of video and online training and have learned a lot in the process. For example, keep the videos short (4-6 minutes) and follow up each video with a short online test to solidify the content. Interaction with others going through the content is also important which is why I fully support some level of group training even if using online methods.

I’m very interested in hearing from any of you about what you are doing to bring your team and your organization’s employees up to speed on crisis plans. And if you would like to have a look at any of these training videos being done for clients, with their permission, I’ll share a bit of that with you. Just email me at gerald.baron@agincourt.us and we’ll set up a time to review.

 

Advice to CEOs: Don’t turn your PR over to lawyers

In most crisis situations it is absolutely essential for attorneys and PR experts to work well together. Indeed, in working on plans for organizations I always ask about who their attorney is, whether or not he/she will review releases, and if they are participating in any drills or exercises. In the majority of events I have been involved in I have worked with some outstanding attorneys who understood and appreciated the nature of the partnership and the reality of the court of law versus the court of public opinion.

But there are two situations where I was involved that stand out in my mind where the CEO deferred all PR judgment to attorneys. That was a big mistake. One was because the company involved was a small subsidiary of a much larger company and the CEO of the subsidiary running the crisis believed that his future was more secure if he deferred to the attorneys (corporate attorneys from the head office). That was understandable, if mistaken. (The subsidiary company went bankrupt.)

The other was because the attorney demanded it. Again, there are reasons from the legal perspective. What is said publicly often impacts court action. The legal challenges may very well affect the viability of the business. However, an attorney who demands full control over PR should be a major warning sign and give any organization leader pause.

The issue always is what is in the best interest of the business or organization. Sometimes, no doubt, the legal challenges take precedence. Sometimes, as was the case with Arthur Andersen, you could win the legal battle but lose the company before you even have a chance to go to court. Only the CEO can determine what is in the best long and short term interest of the business.

Our court system is based on the idea that truth will emerge with aggressive representation of both the plaintiff and defendant. Two different views of events are needed and ideally are presented with equal skill. That is the ideal situation in a crisis that involves legal issues–there should be a strong voice advocating for what is best to win in the court of law, and one that advocates with equal ability for winning in the court of public opinion.

To place an attorney whose job it is to represent you in court in the role of deciding what is in the best interest of the company puts that attorney in a conflict situation. Any attorney who demands it should be released. Any CEO who so defers has signaled that he/she does not have the capability of determining the best interest of the company.

The risks of one spokesperson

Tony Jacques, an Australian crisis communication expert, makes some good points in this post about smaller companies facing crises.

I certainly have seen that mid to smaller size companies typically lag in preparation. I think there is a sense that because they are not large they tend to be immune. Only big crises kill big companies, but of course that is not true. While the death of a brand to a reputation crisis may not be big news if it is a small company, to those involved, death is death.

I want to draw attention though to one important point of his blog: the missing spokesperson. Just recently I was in a message planning session with a client and a question came up about what do we say about such and such a situation. The answer from the head came back quickly: you say nothing, refer every question like that to me.

It may seem the safest approach, but often it is not. For a number of reasons, but I’ll focus on the obvious one highlighted by Jacques’ post. What do you do when your one and only authorized spokesperson is out of town, on an airplane, or worse in an airplane that has hit the ground with devastating impact.

In best practice planning, every major leadership position in a response plan has at least three and sometimes four people capable of filling the role. That gets harder with smaller companies, but it remains essential. A company with a dominant leader who has difficulty delegating authority is especially vulnerable in a crisis.

The company Tony refers to may very well have crafted a wonderful statement in response to the negative publicity. Doesn’t matter if when the media calls there is no one authorized to deliver it.