I was wrong about Twitter. But watch out for Meerkat and Periscope

We’re always looking for the next big thing, aren’t we. Not exactly like venture capitalists, but techno-driven changes in the past two decades have so radically transformed communications and crisis communication that we wonder what will hit us next.

When Twitter came out, what was that 2006?, I quite blithely prognosticated that it would be short lived. Who would want to know what kind of latte you are sipping and with whom? Now Lady Gaga has 45 million followers and some crisis plans have to include the possibility of Lady Gaga saying something bad about them. Twitter is THE necessary tool today for media management, particularly in an emergency or crisis–a shift that started with the crash of USAir into the Hudson.

So, we naturally keep our eye for the next big thing. Bill Boyd has declared that Meerkat and Periscope are the next big thing. More specifically, widespread use of real time video sharing. (Of course, I’m protecting myself against false prognostication by putting the burden on the Chief.)

Why will this be big? I go back to 2010 during Deepwater Horizon. Congressional leaders discovered that BP had a steady stream of video flowing from the ROVs at the bottom of the gulf. Those real time videos showed the oil and mud streaming from the wellhead. They told BP to make those available to the world. My former company, handling web technology for both the government and BP at the time, was asked to set it up. It was very popular. At one time there were twelve different live video streams being broadcast, including from helis and skimmers and wildlife rehabilitation centers. The cost of bandwidth was astronomical. But millions watched transfixed.

I included the possibility of having to provide live video feeds in crisis plans I did following that. I tried to prepare clients for the potential high cost should Congress decide they needed to show the world what was happening.

That was, what, five years ago? My goodness, instead of staying up all night working on the technology to supply those feeds, you just pull up Meerkat or Periscope and start broadcasting to the world.

I won’t get into the details of Twitter’s attempt to kill Meerkat and which app is better. Lots of coverage on that. What I will point out is that this brings citizen journalism to a new level. It is truly citizen broadcasting, in real time, all the time.

Awhile back, reflecting on the Boston Marathon manhunt and how people were sharing information in real time in a variety of ways I did a video called “NanoNews.” It’s not a good name for this new phenomenon of real time news. It’s hardly tiny. It’s huge. But 2 billion people carrying smart phones starting to broadcast their little picture of the world, well, maybe nanonews does fit.

It certainly adds some major risks, including to the issue of verification. On the other hand, there are likely to be big benefits as well. For example, TheePharoh is the now famous tweeter who told the story of Ferguson police gunning down an unarmed black man including photos of Brown lying on the ground. He told the story as he saw it no doubt. But if that act had been Meerkatted or Periscoped might we have seen a different picture? Could we have seen what the justice department did–that it was an act of self defense?

I think this is going to be big. But, don’t ask me, ask Bill.

 

Wendy’s GoPro Driven Ride with Lettuce–this is how food producers should roll

I love this video from Wendy’s. Thanks to the now almost ubiquitous GoPro, we take a ride with romaine lettuce from the farm to the Wendy’s table. It’s short, entertaining and doggone effective marketing.

I’m working more and more with food producers these days, who actually have a lot more in common with big oil than they can even begin to realize. Farmers and food producers of any size or scale (except for those part timers who decry the fact they can’t make much money raising organic produce on their five acre patch) are facing a widening gap between producer and consumer.

Consumers of course want the incredible green revolution benefits of exceptionally healthy and low cost food. But their skepticism about health and production methods is growing–fueled I believe by the alarmists who have much to gain fomenting unreasonable fear (including most media). The response to this is not to stick their heads in the sand but to realize that we live in a new age of transparency. That transparency extends to how our food is made and delivered to us.

That’s why I really liked what McDonald’s Canada did a few years ago when they got complaints about the difference between the photos of burgers vs burgers delivered over the counter. It’s why I really like this Wendy’s video.

Farmers, processors, distributors and retailers–take note. People are watching. The way you do things matters more than ever. And it will be seen. Either by you, or by some hidden camera that creates a viral video. If you don’t like that idea, show it yourself. And if you cringe thinking about what others might think when the see it, then rethink your processes while you have the time.

Great lessons on rumor management and how to apologize

Two of my favorite bloggers, Tony Jaques in Australia and Jonathan and Erik Bernstein from California, had excellent posts and two of the most important topics: rumor management and apologies.

Tony tells the story of a hepatitis A scare in Australia that got linked to a frozen berry product.  The company out of an abundance of caution as they like to say, voluntarily recalled their product without verification their product was the cause. From there as you will see the media did their thing and the company apparently did not do enough to correct the misreporting.

The lesson is clear: a lie (or error) repeated often enough becomes the truth. The only way I know to deal with this is to loudly, clearly over and over and over tell the truth and correct the misinformation.

On the topic of apologies, the Bernstein’s rightly congratulate Anthem on their excellent apology following the hacking of 80 million members’ data. The Bernstein’s analysis is spot on as usual, but what struck me is what the company was offering to help assure peace of mind. Plus the fact that the CEO empathized clearly noting that his personal information was part of the hack.

It’s not enough to simply say you’re sorry. You have to say what you are doing to prevent it from happening and most of all communicate that you truly understand how those impacted feel. Not an easy job but well done by Anthem.