I was wrong about Twitter. But watch out for Meerkat and Periscope

We’re always looking for the next big thing, aren’t we. Not exactly like venture capitalists, but techno-driven changes in the past two decades have so radically transformed communications and crisis communication that we wonder what will hit us next.

When Twitter came out, what was that 2006?, I quite blithely prognosticated that it would be short lived. Who would want to know what kind of latte you are sipping and with whom? Now Lady Gaga has 45 million followers and some crisis plans have to include the possibility of Lady Gaga saying something bad about them. Twitter is THE necessary tool today for media management, particularly in an emergency or crisis–a shift that started with the crash of USAir into the Hudson.

So, we naturally keep our eye for the next big thing. Bill Boyd has declared that Meerkat and Periscope are the next big thing. More specifically, widespread use of real time video sharing. (Of course, I’m protecting myself against false prognostication by putting the burden on the Chief.)

Why will this be big? I go back to 2010 during Deepwater Horizon. Congressional leaders discovered that BP had a steady stream of video flowing from the ROVs at the bottom of the gulf. Those real time videos showed the oil and mud streaming from the wellhead. They told BP to make those available to the world. My former company, handling web technology for both the government and BP at the time, was asked to set it up. It was very popular. At one time there were twelve different live video streams being broadcast, including from helis and skimmers and wildlife rehabilitation centers. The cost of bandwidth was astronomical. But millions watched transfixed.

I included the possibility of having to provide live video feeds in crisis plans I did following that. I tried to prepare clients for the potential high cost should Congress decide they needed to show the world what was happening.

That was, what, five years ago? My goodness, instead of staying up all night working on the technology to supply those feeds, you just pull up Meerkat or Periscope and start broadcasting to the world.

I won’t get into the details of Twitter’s attempt to kill Meerkat and which app is better. Lots of coverage on that. What I will point out is that this brings citizen journalism to a new level. It is truly citizen broadcasting, in real time, all the time.

Awhile back, reflecting on the Boston Marathon manhunt and how people were sharing information in real time in a variety of ways I did a video called “NanoNews.” It’s not a good name for this new phenomenon of real time news. It’s hardly tiny. It’s huge. But 2 billion people carrying smart phones starting to broadcast their little picture of the world, well, maybe nanonews does fit.

It certainly adds some major risks, including to the issue of verification. On the other hand, there are likely to be big benefits as well. For example, TheePharoh is the now famous tweeter who told the story of Ferguson police gunning down an unarmed black man including photos of Brown lying on the ground. He told the story as he saw it no doubt. But if that act had been Meerkatted or Periscoped might we have seen a different picture? Could we have seen what the justice department did–that it was an act of self defense?

I think this is going to be big. But, don’t ask me, ask Bill.

 

2 thoughts on “I was wrong about Twitter. But watch out for Meerkat and Periscope”

  1. Crisis communicators and Incident/Unified Command also need to be ready to deal with another video development: drone video.

    A thousand dollars (or less) will buy a great video drone, capable of overflying up to half a mile into your response area.

    Don’t even hope that flight restrictions will apply to drones. You will be flown over, and you will be filmed.

    So what is your strategy to deal with virtually real-time videos of response activities? How do you counter the ultimate photo pool?

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