All posts by gbaron

Partisan extremes show up big time in social media in Europe

We talk a lot about the extreme partisanship in American politics. Seems Europe has at least some of the same phenomenon. We also talk about the “Digital mob” and the lack of civility in political discourse.

Economist has some insights (again!). This article called Extreme Tweeting shows how the right and left extremes in European politics far dominate use of social media. It’s clear that politicians on the far left and far right are both far better at using social media than those more down the middle and that their audiences are far larger and far more engaged. But why?

The article suggests several reasons. 1) they are more prolific users, 2) “Social media reward starkness, not subtlety” 3)  faster reaction because they don’t seem to sweat over delicacies (ala Trump I suppose) 4) they are more into organizing and activating.

I am finding this is true not just in politics, but in issue management. It is the extremes that seem to dominate. The problem is, to compete in this environment it seems you are almost forced into being extreme yourself–and that something us moderates and responsible types struggle with.

The Politics of Food Fear

We live in a strange time. Particularly when it comes to food. Without any doubt our food is cheaper, safer and of higher quality than ever before. We have far more choices. We have far more industry and government scrutiny. Yet, more and more people–particularly young people–seem scared to death of their food. I saw a recent study that showed concern about our food is rising faster and is a greater concern in our country than foreign policy and just about any issue that affects our future.

Food fear stems from multiple causes. Let me suggest a couple at least.

  1. Constant, global news.
    Media (including bloggers, social media channel managers, lawyers, etc.) understand there is public concern around food. So if a child in Budapest gets sick from food poisoning, somewhere it is going to show up on some form of news. Make it a dozen children, or a fatality or two and it is going to grab major headlines. Chipotle (not may favorite food outlet for their cynical effort to contribute to food fear through marketing) closed 43 restaurants in the Pacific Northwest for 49 cases of e.coli. Not sure how many of those are hospitalized and there are no fatalities, thank God and good medical care. But it made global news. A story on KOMO News in Seattle a few days ago highlighted the fact that 48 million Americans get sick from some form of food poisoning every year. Holy Mackerel! Talk about your epidemics. Yet, what is this compared to what it was maybe 50 years ago?
  2. Media, Social Media and FUDO.
    Fear, Uncertainty, Doubt and Outrage are the currency of attention and attention is what everyone in any form of the media business needs desperately. You can’t put cute cats or farting babies on every newscast, so you have to do something to capture eyes. That KOMO report I mentioned is an example. There is no context provided, no comparison, no moderating comment about this being because of dramatically improved reporting, medical care and government scrutiny. That it does not represent the kind of danger to the population that this report would suggest.

    An even better example of this is the recent news from the World Health Organization that red meat and processed meat in particular is right up there with cigarettes and plutonium. The truth is the actual report is much, much less scary than the headlines and the report itself is deeply flawed because they bagged on the question of any safe quantity. Nevertheless, this report provides exactly the FUDO currency news outlets need–particularly for headlines.  Note the considerable difference between the headline and the story in this BBC account below.

  3. Food fear and politics
    But this story about red and processed meat and the World Health Organization is more than about media and their sensationalism for survival. It is also about politics. There is no doubt that many will be jumping up and down about this report, not just because they are vegans, but because it seems now clear that the WHO announcement is driven more by global first world vs third world politics and particularly around global warming. The Wall Street Journal identified the connection in this article.

    Your reaction to that article will likely depend on your orientation to the issues of global warming, raising beef or other animals, and food safety. I recently read an intriguing book called “Defending Beef” written by a former environmental lawyer who went around suing people for destroying the environment, then met and married a grass fed beef farmer. She takes on the global warming connection between raising beef and greenhouse gases. I found it pretty convincing even though I think it a bit funny how only the benefits to the environment of animal farming, which she powerfully documents, accrue to grass fed beef and no beef that are fed any grains.

    I hope people look closely at the reports about the red meat scare. You will see that yes, consuming vast amounts of almost any substance is going to harm you and that includes too much bacon and sausage. However, the likely impact of you on what most people eat is minimal at best and most likely non-existent. That does not keep those in that building in New York from sending a message that they know will result in the scary headlines of almost any news outlet carrying the story. The sad thing in my mind is as the truth becomes more clear, it is the credibility of the World Health Organization that will be hurt, and that may be to the detriment of all of us. In the meantime, the media beast has been fed and those who think our food is killing us have one more piece of “evidence.”

  1. Screenshot 2015-11-12 10.21.54

Attack your attackers? Amazon adds ammunition to the argument

One of the most controversial issues in current public relations and crisis communication thinking is the issue of dealing with attacks from the media. I have run into this several times in the past year in work I have been doing so I know it is very much a live issue.

The non-confrontational answer: 1) remain focused on telling your positive story 2) don’t pick a fight with someone who buys ink by the barrel 3) don’t elevate a story beyond what it is making the situation worse by drawing more attention to it or drawing it out into a longer crisis

The confrontational answer: 1) A lie repeated often enough becomes the truth 2) reputation is based on credibility and if the attack has serious weaknesses in facts or truth it is necessary to point that out 3) its a black hat/white hat world and and accusation (naturally white hat) will stand unless thoroughly refuted and the black hat placed on the accuser

There is no doubt that I tend toward the second answer more than the first, with this caveat: it is very much situation dependent.

While I think the great majority of PR thinking is still based on the first one, I see more and more evidence of the second approach being used and to good effect. I’ve commented here earlier on a couple of examples of Elon Musk taking on his critics both in the federal government and in the New York Times. Now we see Jeff Bezos taking on the New York Times on the issue of the work culture at Amazon.

It’s a huge issue. Amazon’s rep took a huge hit with the piece by the Times. Was it fair? You decide. Does it give more credence to the non-confrontational or confrontational approach. Which is best long term for Amazon’s reputation? Would it have been better for Bezos and his comm team to let the issue die quietly, or would it have continued to fester? Is his response sufficient to overcome the evidence presented by NYT. I see all these as ultimately about credibility–given this, who will emerge as the winner?

I’d love to hear other thoughts on this. Because it is a question I face almost every day being actively involved in issue and crisis management where the question is far from academic.


Moving the black hat: A lesson from the GMO debate.

White hats and black hats. In its simplest form that is the way the reputation game is played. I attributed this in Now Is Too Late to the move of Walter Cronkite style journalism into prime-time television with the launch of “60 Minutes.” Having to compete with drama on TV, they adopted the simplest and most satisfying form of drama: melodrama. And the melodrama is characterized by overly simplified portrayals of white hats (good guys) and black hats (bad guys) fighting over the maiden in distress (any form of public good).

In crisis communication and reputation management, you normally have the black hat on. Someone is accusing you of something. The accusers, as portrayed in media reports, almost universally where the white hat with little attention paid to their motives, interests, or even credibility of their accusations. Why? Because it fits the formula. Nuance doesn’t play well in melodrama or “investigative reports.”

But a major strategic question in these issues is when and how do you get the black hat off you? One response is to do your best to change hats. Knowing that the media will only play this white hat black hat game, unless the hat colors switch, you are going to be stuck.

Being very involved in food related issues, this is a particularly challenging question. I’ve watched the GMO debate with great interest (and frankly, great frustration as long time readers here know). The very voices who rail at the ignorance of climate change deniers for their stubborn resistance to scientific consensus, completely change position when it comes to GMO. The scientific consensus is very clear: GMOs are safe, in fact, likely help make food safer. But, despite the incredible amount of scientific study, the anti-GMO activists cling to their attacks. Even Michael Pollan, the respected food writer, says in effect, well, I’m not really saying that GMOs are bad, but they should be labeled. As I argued before, that for 57% of the population would be putting a poison label on these foods. Do Michael and company really think putting the skull and crossbones symbol on food that is known to be completely safe is in the public interest?

While it seems that the pendulum is swinging and that in general the public is coming to understand that the activists are out to lunch on this, those defending continue to be on the defensive. They continue to wear the black hat, which may only be turning slightly gray. The only way to really move the dial on this issue is to switch hats.

And that is what William Saletan has done in this very important article in Slate. In this meticulously researched article, he demonstrates the dishonesty and hypocrisy of the anti-GMO activists. As the subhead states: GMO food is safe. The rhetoric is dangerous.

As always, these debates involve the public good. If you are going to put a black hat on someone, you have to demonstrate that what they are doing is harmful to innocent people or the environment. Clearly the activists have been harmful as he makes very clear.

Moving the hats isn’t an easy thing, particularly when the accusers have had the benefit of media presenting the story in their typical melodrama fashion for so long. And personally it can be dangerous. The “true believers” in the anti-GMO camp will likely turn on Slate and Saletan with a vengeance. Until many other voices like Saletan’s join in the discussion, calling out the Chipotles and Whole Foods of the world for their participation in something they see as harmful, there will be continuing confusion about who are the good guys and who the bad guys here.

It is interesting to see how the major media are dealing with the shift. Case in point: New York Times published a guest editorial from Mark Lynas in April. Lynas is the well-known British anti-GMO activist turned GMO promoter. But we do not see a NYT article or other mainstream outlets doing the melodrama treatment on Greenpeace or the other activist groups. When we do, we will know that the melodrama game has turned against those anti-science true believers.




Post mortem on BP’s PR demonstrates dangers of commenting in the dark

Bloggers like me often comment on how organizations are dealing with crises. I do often with a sense of dread knowing that I really don’t know what is going on inside and may not be aware of critical issues that are affecting the response.

That danger was highlighted to me to the extreme when I read today’s comments by Deborah Watson on PR Daily’s blog. My biggest concern is by getting the facts so wrong, the real lessons to be learned from BP’s reputation problems are missed, and therefore those interested will likely take away the wrong things.

I’ll comment on each of the five points she raises as BP’s biggest blunders. (Her comments are italicized).

1. Failure to prepare.

One of the comments made many times by analysts was how little the company seemed to be geared up to handle a crisis of this nature.

Given the type of industry, one would have thought that even the simplest analysis of strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats would have pointed to this such disaster as a possible scenario, around which the comms team should have always been prepared to respond.

However big your company, knowing your areas of crisis susceptibility is vital.

Nothing could be further from the truth. BP’s preparations were extensive, in part because they are mandatory. Under the Oil Pollution Act of 1990, all oil companies are required to conduct annual drills, called PREP drills, along with local, state and federal agencies. Every three years they are required to conduct a worst case scenario drill, and every so often participate in a national exercise called the SONS or Spill of National Significance. BP took preparations exceptionally seriously, including the crisis communication side. It is true, that the combination of factors that led to a uncontrolled release a mile beneath the gulf surface was not properly contemplated.

And here is the real lesson to be learned: Don’t just drill the last big event. Use your imagination, no holds barred, to envision scenarios beyond anything you think possible. This was certainly one of those. The problem was not lack of preparation, but lack of imagination. I suspect most companies have that problem as well.

2. Manipulation (or lack of true knowledge) of the facts.

In the first stages of the crisis, the company went to the press saying that the spill was only to the tune of around 1,000 barrels a day. It turned out the stat was five times the amount, but even then, company spokespeople downplayed the figure.

Knowing the facts and taking time to confirm them is imperative if you’re going to face the press to speak about your crisis. It ensures credibility from the outset. 

This is one of the greatest false accusations against BP and simply demonstrates lack of understanding of how the Oil Pollution Act works and how the Incident Command System works. Immediately after an event like this occurs (initially the event was the explosion on the platform, it was not until the platform was flooded with water and collapsed did the major spill occur) the ICS kicks in. Local, state and federal officials work directly with the Responsible Party (owner of the oil) and operate in a structure called Unified Command. UC has authority over everything, including releasing information. While all are equal, the FOSC (federal on-scene coordinator) is more equal than the others and if not satisfied can “federalize” the response. Together they are responsible for the release of information about the amount being spilled. The truth is initially the spill volume was limited for reasons I just mentioned and it was ultimately the Coast Guard Incident Commander who bore final authority for the release of the information. When BP was asked about this later, they commented that the spill volume didn’t matter in terms of the response because they treated it from the beginning as if it was unlimited. That’s the fact. They sent out a global call for all boom they could get their hands on.

There are two real lessons to be learned here: 1) Be very cautious at the early stages about any characterization of the event because the media and others (such as commentators) will be quick to use any error here to undermine your credibility. A better example of underestimating and the high cost involved is the Cosco Busan spill. Here is was really underestimated with serious reputation consequences. 2) Correct the misreports. This story went out right away about BP underestimating the volume. One discussion I had with both government communicators and BP during the event was to be much more aggressive in pointing out and correcting wrong reports and conclusions. But that violates old PR rules and they were reluctant to do that. I am more convinced than ever, and this repeated “mistake” makes it clear, that fact checking is one of the most important responsibilities of a communicator.

3. Lack of compassion.

The comments of CEO Tony Hayward have certainly gone down in history. Lives had been lost in the crisis and the implications environmentally and economically were huge for many – but he wanted his “life back.”

This comment garnered disgust and annoyance from the press and the public. Choose your messaging and your spokesperson wisely.

This one is particularly irritating to me, probably because I knew a lot of the people involved. I know how they were hurting. I know the compassion and sorrow they felt for the loss of life and for the environmental damage. And I know how hard they tried to communicate that in an incredibly hostile media and political environment.

But, at the same time I used Tony Hayward’s quote and his subsequent loss of position often in presentations and writing to demonstrate the importance of always staying on message. But blaming this on an uncompassionate company and uncompassionate CEO is just plain wrong, and again misses some very important lessons.

1. A hostile public, media and political environment. The real PR disaster that BP faced was the fact that they spilled oil into the gulf in full view of the entire world for 90 days without being able to stop it. No lipstick will make that pig look good. Then you had an administration which, determined to avoid the Katrina blame placed on President Bush, took every opportunity to heap outrage on BP–often very dishonestly. Add to this the fact that few have much sympathy for Big Oil–huge lessons in that alone. So to me the real lesson was that BP was unwilling to be more aggressive and independent in their public communication until well into the event. When I questioned them during the event about this the answer was until the spill is contained we don’t feel we can say much. But that 90 days were devastating and while the 20 years under OPA 90 prior to the spill practiced cooperative communication with government officials, the hostile approach the administration took required a much more independent and aggressive communication response.

The second important lesson is to limit the exposure of your CEO and spokesperson. I have counseled many after this that the primary face of an event of this nature should be someone in the organization who is operationally expendable. That sounds terrible. But the reason is that sooner or later something may be said that the vicious media will hang on to to hang the spokesperson and company. Hayward’s problem is that he became a bit of a media rock star, making himself visible and available on almost a 24/7 basis. Clearly he did not want to make the mistake of Exxon’s CEO in not even showing up to the scene. But that 24/7 media access meant it was only a matter of time that he would provide an out of context sound bite that would kill him. It’s a dirty shame that the context of the interview is missed. He was trying to communicate how devastating the event was to him and the company. But that one sound bite: “I want my life back” was used (abused) to create an impression of lack of compassion. All the expressions of deep concern and compassion he had previously made were lost. The lesson: use an expendable spokesperson and limit exposure time to enable them to stay completely on message.

4. Deflection of blame.

BP made a big point of the fact that the rig was owned by Transocean, and in so doing, came across as trying to deflect responsibility.

Sure, mention other parties, but in so doing, provide a shared collaborative message around how you are all doing your best to resolve matters swiftly.

For BP, it came across as if the company was trying to buy wriggle room.

This one is also very irritating. As the provider of the web-based communication system that both BP and the Coast Guard used, we were contacted very soon after the event began. In those first confusing minutes and hours it was not known exactly what happened or who was responsible. The fact is that the rig belonged to Transocean. It is an important response question because under OPA 90 (Oil Pollution Act of 1990) the owner of the oil is the responsible party. But it was quite soon after the initial event that BP assumed the actual responsibility under the Act, and launched a response website along with the Coast Guard.

One of the big lessons to be learned is there is a big difference between legal responsibility and public responsibility. The truth is, as courts determined, the spill responsibility was shared by BP, Transocean and Halliburton who supplied the failed cement. That being said, BP always and over and over and over said in their public statements that they were assuming full responsibility for the response. What became a problem was when they were called to testify to Congress. Congressional testimony is quasi-judicial and therefore would play heavily in the legal case assigning damages. So in that testimony they were far more careful in accepting responsibility and of course this was jumped on by the media despite the repeated statements of accepting full responsibility for stopping the spill and cleaning up the mess.

The lesson in this is not the BP tried to avoid responsibility, but that the legal and communication team need to work together as much as possible (before an event if at all possible) to recognize and understand the challenges this issue of liability and responsibility pose. The biggest lesson is, as mentioned above, BP should have been far more aggressive, and righteously indignant, about the reports suggesting they were ducking responsibility. The message should have been: we don’t know and we won’t know for a long time who his legally responsible, but we do know and all our actions are demonstrating it, that we don’t care about that issue right now, as we are taking full and complete responsibility to deal with this disaster.

5. Being angry and unavailable.

Many felt that BP came across as annoyed with the press interference, and that leaders were much much less available in terms of updates and commentary than they might have been.

Keeping your audience in the loop, at regular intervals, helps to no end with credibility. It shows you are keeping communication going and that you have not forgotten your level of responsibility or the fact that so many are now relying on you for answers.

I really have no idea where Ms Watson is coming from on this one. Perhaps it was the huge issue made by the press that BP was keeping responders from talking to the media. The protocol in an ICS response with a Joint Information Center operating is to have media questions directed to the JIC. When some responders on the beach told reporters they were told not to talk to them, the press incorrectly reported that BP was hiding information. In reality, BP was not controlling media access and at that time it was the White House who was dictating media messages and policy. However, the issue became severe enough that Admiral Allen, the National Incident Commander, issued a Media Policy that stated everyone can talk to the media but were to keep their comments restricted to their particular area of responsibility. The real lesson is that following this event, this is exactly the kind of media access policy that should be adopted, not the outdated one that said refer everything to the spokesperson.

BP was part of the JIC for the first month a half. Then they were kicked out of the JIC by the White House and it became, as CNN called it, “talking points from the administration.” BP always made itself available, but did not aggressively and proactively defend itself believing, incorrectly I believe, that until the spill was contained, it was best they let the government speak for the response. By that time the reputation damage was done and BP suffered under a false impression of not being forthcoming.

Again, a major lesson, particularly for private companies operating in a JIC environment, is be prepared to go independent and be prepared for the political leaders involved to inoculate themselves by aiding the media in heaping blame and outrage. It is still far better, and it would have been better all around, if the government and BP could have remained in the JIC and communicated the message that they were in it together. No such luck here. But to blame political decisions about how to best form public opinion on BP is again to misunderstand the fundamental situation.

OK, my rant is over. I do not blame Ms. Watson snor do I wish to leave the impression that I think her analysis of the PR problems is wrong. What this points out to me that without knowledge of what is really happening, and making judgments based on media reports is almost certain to lead to misunderstandings. It would be better (and this is a lesson for me as an occasional commentator on others’ crises) is to say: based on how the media reported the story, it looks like this, and given these reports, this is how the company should have or should respond.






Apologies passé?

You may have noticed as I have how apologies have become much  more common in recent years than they were a few years ago. I attribute this to lessons learned and the growing recognition of the necessity of reputation management, particularly in the digital/social media world.

But, when they become routine they also quickly become meaningless. Tony Jacques has an excellent post on this including some good ideas on how to determine when it is in your interest to apologize and when not. In one example he gives, of Brian Williams pseudo-apology for “misremembering” I think it points out the need for caution about conditional apologies. You know the kind. When I have done something wrong and want to apologize to my wife, there is always the tendency to say “I’m sorry, but…” If you are going to apologize, apologize. Don’t use weasel words, don’t make up words, don’t do it half-heartedly. If there is explanation for what happened and why you did what you did, save it for another message, but don’t fall to the temptation to water down your apology.


When is it TMI?

I’ve noticed a major strategy issue emerging in some recent crises I’ve been involved in. When is addressing issues and concerns in your statements providing too much information?

For example, eliminating the potential source of a food borne illness. Saying something like: “The illness is not linked to this source because of …”  Or, “we have eliminated the possibility of the accident being caused by…”

The disagreement in strategy relates to the belief that it is best to say as little as possible. People may not have even considered that source or cause, or those observing might not have even know that that was food was served or that situation existing to possibly cause an accident, so why bring it to their attention? It is a very good point and I can see the danger of doing so.

However, my philosophy has long been to identify the potential questions and address them in your statements as much as you possibly can. This does two things: communicates openness and transparency. More important, it reduces the questions that have to be answered. If some media outlets (or stakeholders) ask a question about it and others don’t, the reports are going to come out mixed and likely inconsistent. That undermines trust.

Managing a large volume of inquiries is one of the biggest challenges in a major crisis and most plans that I’ve seen to not adequately prepare for it. Providing consistency of responses and insuring information discipline is another big problem. Both of these are addressed, in my thinking, by providing answers to potential questions in the published statements.

No doubt there are circumstances where raising an issue is going to cause considerably more harm than the benefit gained. But, in general I’ve seen there is an unwarranted reluctance to address touchy subjects even when it is clear the question will have to be addressed.

But, would love to hear your thoughts on this.

The three basic crisis communication strategies

While I mostly talk to company, agency or organization leaders about crisis communication and reputation management, sometimes the reputation in question belongs to an individual.  You don’t have to be a celebrity to have potential for reputation disaster.  Individuals whose name is attached to the business or profession they are in, in other words where their name is also a brand, are particularly susceptible. Search engines and the long memory of the internet make the problem so much greater. Yesterday’s newspaper is already in the garbage and yesterday’s TV report is already in the ether along with all past reports, but on the Internet they are retained presumably for ever, and always accessible at the touch of a Google button.

A recent conversation reminded me of how the Internet has changed reputation management and how it therefore changes the response. The really big question when dealing with media coverage of bad news about a brand (personal, corporate or otherwise) is whether or not to respond, and if so, how far and wide to push the response. The basic rule is: don’t make it worse. You can make it worse by bringing the bad reports to the attention of others who might otherwise have missed the 11 pm news. Maybe it will all just go away. Or, not.

There are no hard and fast rules for making a decision on whether to respond or not, but the three basic communication strategies I’ve incorporated into the OnePage Crisis Communication Plan are useful in helping to make a good decision. The three strategies are Reactive, Semi-Proactive and Proactive.

Reactive involves creating a Holding Statement, Standby Statement or other such name. It is not intended for release, but to provide to reporters or others asking about the situation should media reports arise or social media interest trend upward. It provides your version of the events or story, including if appropriate an apology and explanation of what you are doing about fixing whatever went wrong.

Semi-Proactive is a minor or discreet public release of your story. If you have a website it can be placed in a quiet position, not hidden, but not blatantly visible. It could be included in a Facebook account, but not advisable as Facebook and certainly Twitter I would consider distribution tools, essentially push communications rather than pull communications. If you do use FB or Twitter for the semi-proactive I would have a very gentle headline leading to a more detailed document posted publicly elsewhere. The idea here is to post publicly so that no one can say you are hiding, but not in a way that calls attention to it. If reporters call and ask for your statement, you can say, I posted my comments publicly several hours/days/weeks ago. It shows openness and willingness to communicate but, if handled right, does not draw unneeded attention.

Proactive, as it suggests, is aggressively distributing your story or information. Sending via email. Broadcasting through your social media channels. Distributing releases. Dominant position on your website. YouTube video. Whatever. But again, there are nuances here. Decisions still have to be made about how far and wide to go. The general rule I try to follow is to closely monitor the track the story is taking in the media and social media and try to stay one step ahead. Underlying this whole strategy is the fundamental principle that if there is bad news, it should come from you, not someone else.



I was wrong about Twitter. But watch out for Meerkat and Periscope

We’re always looking for the next big thing, aren’t we. Not exactly like venture capitalists, but techno-driven changes in the past two decades have so radically transformed communications and crisis communication that we wonder what will hit us next.

When Twitter came out, what was that 2006?, I quite blithely prognosticated that it would be short lived. Who would want to know what kind of latte you are sipping and with whom? Now Lady Gaga has 45 million followers and some crisis plans have to include the possibility of Lady Gaga saying something bad about them. Twitter is THE necessary tool today for media management, particularly in an emergency or crisis–a shift that started with the crash of USAir into the Hudson.

So, we naturally keep our eye for the next big thing. Bill Boyd has declared that Meerkat and Periscope are the next big thing. More specifically, widespread use of real time video sharing. (Of course, I’m protecting myself against false prognostication by putting the burden on the Chief.)

Why will this be big? I go back to 2010 during Deepwater Horizon. Congressional leaders discovered that BP had a steady stream of video flowing from the ROVs at the bottom of the gulf. Those real time videos showed the oil and mud streaming from the wellhead. They told BP to make those available to the world. My former company, handling web technology for both the government and BP at the time, was asked to set it up. It was very popular. At one time there were twelve different live video streams being broadcast, including from helis and skimmers and wildlife rehabilitation centers. The cost of bandwidth was astronomical. But millions watched transfixed.

I included the possibility of having to provide live video feeds in crisis plans I did following that. I tried to prepare clients for the potential high cost should Congress decide they needed to show the world what was happening.

That was, what, five years ago? My goodness, instead of staying up all night working on the technology to supply those feeds, you just pull up Meerkat or Periscope and start broadcasting to the world.

I won’t get into the details of Twitter’s attempt to kill Meerkat and which app is better. Lots of coverage on that. What I will point out is that this brings citizen journalism to a new level. It is truly citizen broadcasting, in real time, all the time.

Awhile back, reflecting on the Boston Marathon manhunt and how people were sharing information in real time in a variety of ways I did a video called “NanoNews.” It’s not a good name for this new phenomenon of real time news. It’s hardly tiny. It’s huge. But 2 billion people carrying smart phones starting to broadcast their little picture of the world, well, maybe nanonews does fit.

It certainly adds some major risks, including to the issue of verification. On the other hand, there are likely to be big benefits as well. For example, TheePharoh is the now famous tweeter who told the story of Ferguson police gunning down an unarmed black man including photos of Brown lying on the ground. He told the story as he saw it no doubt. But if that act had been Meerkatted or Periscoped might we have seen a different picture? Could we have seen what the justice department did–that it was an act of self defense?

I think this is going to be big. But, don’t ask me, ask Bill.


Wendy’s GoPro Driven Ride with Lettuce–this is how food producers should roll

I love this video from Wendy’s. Thanks to the now almost ubiquitous GoPro, we take a ride with romaine lettuce from the farm to the Wendy’s table. It’s short, entertaining and doggone effective marketing.

I’m working more and more with food producers these days, who actually have a lot more in common with big oil than they can even begin to realize. Farmers and food producers of any size or scale (except for those part timers who decry the fact they can’t make much money raising organic produce on their five acre patch) are facing a widening gap between producer and consumer.

Consumers of course want the incredible green revolution benefits of exceptionally healthy and low cost food. But their skepticism about health and production methods is growing–fueled I believe by the alarmists who have much to gain fomenting unreasonable fear (including most media). The response to this is not to stick their heads in the sand but to realize that we live in a new age of transparency. That transparency extends to how our food is made and delivered to us.

That’s why I really liked what McDonald’s Canada did a few years ago when they got complaints about the difference between the photos of burgers vs burgers delivered over the counter. It’s why I really like this Wendy’s video.

Farmers, processors, distributors and retailers–take note. People are watching. The way you do things matters more than ever. And it will be seen. Either by you, or by some hidden camera that creates a viral video. If you don’t like that idea, show it yourself. And if you cringe thinking about what others might think when the see it, then rethink your processes while you have the time.