Tag Archives: media response

Attack your attackers? Amazon adds ammunition to the argument

One of the most controversial issues in current public relations and crisis communication thinking is the issue of dealing with attacks from the media. I have run into this several times in the past year in work I have been doing so I know it is very much a live issue.

The non-confrontational answer: 1) remain focused on telling your positive story 2) don’t pick a fight with someone who buys ink by the barrel 3) don’t elevate a story beyond what it is making the situation worse by drawing more attention to it or drawing it out into a longer crisis

The confrontational answer: 1) A lie repeated often enough becomes the truth 2) reputation is based on credibility and if the attack has serious weaknesses in facts or truth it is necessary to point that out 3) its a black hat/white hat world and and accusation (naturally white hat) will stand unless thoroughly refuted and the black hat placed on the accuser

There is no doubt that I tend toward the second answer more than the first, with this caveat: it is very much situation dependent.

While I think the great majority of PR thinking is still based on the first one, I see more and more evidence of the second approach being used and to good effect. I’ve commented here earlier on a couple of examples of Elon Musk taking on his critics both in the federal government and in the New York Times. Now we see Jeff Bezos taking on the New York Times on the issue of the work culture at Amazon.

It’s a huge issue. Amazon’s rep took a huge hit with the piece by the Times. Was it fair? You decide. Does it give more credence to the non-confrontational or confrontational approach. Which is best long term for Amazon’s reputation? Would it have been better for Bezos and his comm team to let the issue die quietly, or would it have continued to fester? Is his response sufficient to overcome the evidence presented by NYT. I see all these as ultimately about credibility–given this, who will emerge as the winner?

I’d love to hear other thoughts on this. Because it is a question I face almost every day being actively involved in issue and crisis management where the question is far from academic.